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Wildlife Trade Specialists

Seized poached elephant tusks and poacher's weapons, Oyem, Gabon © WWF / James Morgan

wildlife crime disrupting international wildlife poaching and trafficking networks

Seized poached elephant tusks and poacher's weapons, Oyem, Gabon © WWF / James Morgan

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the span of our work against wildlife crime

Wildlife crime has been a conservation scourge for decades. Poaching and illegal harvesting, particularly in Africa, continues to devastate wildlife populations, threatening the survival of rhinos, elephants, pangolins, rosewoods and a wide variety of other species.

The illegal wildlife trade, now the fourth largest illicit transnational activity in the world, is the fuel that drives the wildlife crime fires. Continuing consumer demand, largely from Asia, for increasingly rare horns, ivory, bones, skins, and precious timber is driving unprecedented wildlife population declines.

according to the UN, the annual value of illegal wildlife trade is estimated to be worth

USD7–21 billion

Crawford Allan, Senior Director, America and Wildlife Crime

Wildlife crime goes beyond conservation issues, it is also a threat to national and regional security, a barrier to sustainable human development and a fuel for corruption

Crawford Allan, Senior Director, America and Wildlife Crime

more about key species affected by wildlife crime

a selection of our projects fighting wildlife crime

reports related to WILDLIFE CRIME

The majority of our reports cover some aspect relating to wildlife crime or illegal trade. This is the latest selection of publications exclusively relating to illegal trade.

Visit our publications library for the full TRAFFIC archive.