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Wildlife Trade Specialists

Northern bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus © Brian J. Skerry / National Geographic Stock / WWF

other aquatic species Working towards traceability and sustainability throughout marine trade

Northern bluefin tuna Thunnus thynnus © Brian J. Skerry / National Geographic Stock / WWF

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maintaining healthy marine populations

As is the case with other areas of wildlife trade, a lack of effective regulation, coupled with high levels of illicit activity, is resulting in catastrophic declines in wild populations of aquatic species worldwide.

Traceability throughout marine and fish trade, appropriate restrictions on destructive harvesting techniques and scientifically-supported quotas would help make significant inroads into reversing the devastating over-exploitation our seas and oceans are currently facing.

65% of abalone

harvested from South African fisheries is done so illegally

Markus Bergener, Senior Programme Officer for TRAFFIC

It is absolutely essential that we implement robust traceability systems throughout trade chains to ensure trade maintains healthy fish populations worldwide

Markus Bergener, Senior Programme Officer for TRAFFIC

priority species

working towards sustainable fisheries

related news , projects and reports to aquatic species

traceability, legality and sustainability is essential to maintaining healthy marine and fish populations. Explore our latest action working towards solutions

related reports to AQUATIC SPECIES

Explore TRAFFIC reports on marine and fish trade and the application of traceability frameworks.

Visit our resource library for the full TRAFFIC publication archive.

Trade in Wildlife Information eXchange
Trade in Wildlife Information eXchange

The African and European Union Trade in Wildlife Information eXchange's are online tools developed to facilitate information exchange and international co-operation between law enforcement agencies.

EU / Africa TWIX

Global Shark and Ray Initiative
Global Shark and Ray Initiative

The goal of the GSRI is that by 2025, the conservation status of the world’s sharks and rays has improved–declines have been halted, extinctions have been prevented, and commitments to their conservation have increased globally.

GSRI