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Wildlife Trade Specialists

Captive Gharial's Gavialis gangeticus at the Royal Chitwan National Park and Gharial Breeding Center in Nepal © Karine Aigner / WWF-US

captive breeding preventing unsustainable trade and the stimulation of illegal demand

Captive Gharial's Gavialis gangeticus at the Royal Chitwan National Park and Gharial Breeding Center in Nepal © Karine Aigner / WWF-US

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captive breeding: our perspective and priorities

In some cases, captive breeding of wildlife is conducted ethically and sustainably, preventing detrimental sourcing from the wild. Many reptiles, amphibians and fish are captive bred for the pet trade, which can contribute to the protection of wild populations. 

Unfortunately, there are many circumstances where captive breeding is conducted illegally and/or unsustainably, either contributing to illegal trade or stimulating unsustainable consumer demand.

7,000+

tigers are believed to be held in tiger farms in Asia

James Compton, Senior Director – Asia Pacific

Tiger farming is an example of captive breeding gone wrong–stimulating consumer demand for illegal trade and threatening already-dwindling wild populations

James Compton, Senior Director – Asia Pacific

evidence to influence on captive breeding