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Forest landscape in Madagascar © WOODS Emma / WWF-Madagascar

Timber Island The Rosewood and Ebony Trade of Madagascar

Forest landscape in Madagascar © WOODS Emma / WWF-Madagascar

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Published 14th February 2017

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New study finds timber harvesting in Madagascar out of control

Antananarivo, Madagascar, 14th February 2017—a combination of political instability, government mismanagement, a lack of forest operation controls and a failure to impose punitive penalties on well-known traffickers contributed to what was effectively zero control over the management of precious timber resources in Madagascar between March 2010 to March 2015, according to a new TRAFFIC study released today. 

Timber Island: The Rosewood and Ebony Trade of Madagascar

Report author(s):
Cynthia Ratsimbazafy, David J. Newton, Stéphane Ringuet

Publication date:
February 2017


Notes:

Timber Island: The Rosewood and Ebony Trade of Madagascar was prepared by TRAFFIC in English and in French under the USAID-funded SCAPES project on “Preserving Madagascar’s Natural Resources”, which aims to combat the illegal trade in Madagascar’s natural resources through capacity building for Malagasy stakeholders.

TRAFFIC has also helped prepare a Framework for the Evaluation of the Legality of Forestry Operations and the Processing and Marketing of Timber: Principles, Criteria and Indicators for Madagascar, which sets out all the relevant legislation regarding timber trade in the country.

The framework is also availble in French: Cadre pour l’Evaluation de la Légalité des Opérations forestières, de la Transformation et de la Commercialisation des bois : Principes, Critères et Indicateurs pour Madagascar.

The SCAPES project was launched in 2013 and is implemented by a consortium of four NGOs: WWF, Wildlife Conservation Society, Conservation International (CI) and TRAFFIC, in close collaboration with civil society and government.