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Many manta rays Manta birostris are chiefly traded for their gill rakers © Jürgen Freund / WWF

Into the deep

Many manta rays Manta birostris are chiefly traded for their gill rakers © Jürgen Freund / WWF

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Published 30th July 2013

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New study gets its teeth into shark trade regulations

Brussels, Belgium, 30th July 2013—A new TRAFFIC study examines how implementation of trade controls through CITES regulations can ensure that seven species of sharks and manta rays are only sourced sustainably and legally before entering international trade. 

Into the deep: Implementing CITES measures for commercially-valuable sharks and manta rays

Report author(s):
Victoria Mundy-Taylor, Vicki Crook

Publication date:
July 2013


Notes:

The Top 20 shark catchers in descending order are Indonesia, India, Spain, Taiwan, Argentina, Mexico, United States of America, Malaysia, Pakistan, Brazil, Japan, France, New Zealand, Thailand, Portugal, Nigeria, Islamic Republic of Iran, Sri Lanka, Republic of Korea and Yemen, who between them account for nearly 80 percent of the total shark catch reported globally, with Indonesia and India alone responsible for over 20% of global catches between 2002 and 2011.  Three EU Member States - Spain, France and Portugal - are among the top 20 shark catchers, responsible for 12% of global catches and, collectively, the 28 EU Member States are the largest shark catching entity of all.