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Juvenile Asian Elephant confiscated from illegal trade in Thailand and purported to have come from Myanmar © Sulma Warne / TRAFFIC

Live elephant trade in Thailand

Juvenile Asian Elephant confiscated from illegal trade in Thailand and purported to have come from Myanmar © Sulma Warne / TRAFFIC

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Published 7th July 2014

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Thailand must act to prevent resurgence of illegal wild elephant trade

Bangkok, Thailand, 7th July 2014—Wild live elephants are being illegally captured to supply the lucrative tourism industry in Thailand and urgent changes to the country's legislation and elephant registration procedures are needed to stop the trafficking, finds a new report released today.

An assessment of the live elephant trade in Thailand

Report author(s):
V. Nijman

Publication date:
July 2014


Notes:

In Thailand there are between 2,500 and 3,200 wild elephants while the captive population is far greater and numbered 4,169 animals in 2012 according to government data. In Asia as a whole some 13 countries are home to a total population of between 40 000 and 50 000 animals. The Asian Elephant is considered by IUCN to be Endangered.


About Elephant Family

Elephant Family was set up to halt the massive decline in numbers of the endangered Asian elephant. In the past 100 years it is estimated the world population of Asian elephants has declined by up to 90%, down to a population of 40,000-50,000. With a corresponding loss of up to 95% of their available habitat over the same period, people and elephants have been forced into the same areas, creating intense conflict between them. Elephant Family are working on the ground with local communities, finding solutions for both wildlife and people. Working where it matters most, tackling the greatest threats to Asian elephants from loss of habitat, the brutality of poaching, and illegal capture from the wild. The Asian elephant is a flagship species and other extraordinary wildlife flourishes in its habitat, including tigers, orangutans and rhinos.