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Souvenir campaigns

Several TRAFFIC campaigns have focused on the souvenir trade - and encourage tourists to be aware of what goods they are purchasing.

Shop Carefully! video produced by the TRAFFIC East Asia office in Taipei to encourage responsible buying of souvenir items

Welcome to Tibet (2.2 MB) A 2006 brochure funded by WWF and TRAFFIC urges tourists not to buy threatened wildlife items when visiting Tibet.

Are you committing a crime? Think before you buy (3.9 MB) A TRAFFIC India leaflet encouraging caution in buying wildlife products


A TRAFFIC India billboard raising awareness about Tiger conservation and (right) images of the board on display in Bangalore

An information panel in Suvarnabhumi airport, Thailand, alerts passengers "wildlife trafficking STOPS here"

A joint TRAFFIC-WWF awareness brochure (PDF, 1.1 MB) in German on illegal wildlife souvenirs

Wildlife awareness campaign, Japan

In Japan, TRAFFIC has produced an educational DVD entitled Our Life and Wildlife – What is CITES? The film aims to educate Japanese travellers about sustainable consumption and CITES.
The video uses the elephant ivory and vicuna trades as two examples of what will happen to wild resources if they are not consumed sustainably, and calls upon viewers to think more deeply about the environment they are leaving for future generations. The DVD has been distributed throughout Japan to diverse audiences, including company employees, college students, public libraries and government agencies and ministries.


Wildlife awareness campaign, China

In 2007, TRAFFIC, WWF, the conservation organization and Ogilvy, an advertising agency, launched an advertising campaign in mainland China aimed at changing consumer attitudes towards unsustainable wildlife trade.

The campaign, consisting of creative print, video and online advertisements in Chinese, is part of an awareness-raising project to inform urban consumers about the environmental harm that illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade causes, and by providing guidance on what actions they can take to help protect species.

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Campaign poster: Graphic images depict the long evolutionary history of a particular species, ending abruptly at the use that threatens its survival.



Campaign video: depicts the sudden end to Tiger evolution. It was shown at a Beijing subway station and on TV stations around mainland China.

The full online campaign (in Chinese) can be viewed at www.trafficchina.org


Awareness materials, Cameroon

A poster raising awareness about wild meat (bushmeat) trade issues, produced by TRAFFIC's Central Africa Programme


TRAFFIC brochure, India

TRAFFIC India has produced a brochure, highlighting their work in the country (PDF, 700 KB)




Awareness materials, Vietnam

Public Service Announcements (PSAs) produced by the WWF and TRAFFIC Greater Mekong Programmes pertaining to wildlife consumption - in particular of civets, pangolins, and king cobras.

 

 

Bookmarks and other items are distributed in Viet Nam to promote wildlife awareness.

 


Stickers are used to raise awareness in Viet Nam as part of a wildlife trade campaign.

Awareness materials, Pakistan

Poaching for their body parts and to supply pet markets in Southeast Asia are serious threats to freshwater turtle species in Pakistan.
The Pakistan Wetlands Programme, implemented by WWF-Pakistan on behalf of the Ministry of Environment, has produced posters in English and Urdu highlighting the plight of these animals and encouraging people to report illegal hunting activities to TRAFFIC International

 

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