Focus on

Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement

...............................................................

International Agreements

CBD l CITES l CMS

...............................................................

Fisheries

Fisheries regulation

...............................................................

Forestry

Timber trade

...............................................................

Iconic wildlife

Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks & rays l Tigers l others

...............................................................

Medicinal plants

Medicinal and aromatic plants

...............................................................

Wildmeat

Wildmeat resources

...............................................................

Pets & fashion

Wild animals used for pets & fashion

...............................................................

Regions

Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East

...............................................................

Powered by Squarespace
Search TRAFFIC
Subscribe to news


Instagram

Subscribe to e-Dispatches
(weekly TRAFFIC email newsletter)

TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from the Rufford Foundation towards this website

Affiliations

TRAFFIC is a founder partner of:

...............................................................

TRAFFIC is a member of:

...............................................................

...............................................................

...............................................................

Also of interest

Wildlife crime is serious - watch the video!

...............................................................

innovate. fight crime. save wildlife.

...............................................................

Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge? More details...

...............................................................

Timber harvest & trade in South America & Europe

...............................................................

Useful links

Awareness raising


Over the years, TRAFFIC has produced a number of materials to raise awareness about wildlife trade issues. Examples of some of them can be found below. Many of the initiatives we have undertaken can broadly be considered to be raising awareness about conservation issues.

Providing information and raising awareness is relatively straightforward, however TRAFFIC's aim to create lasting behvioural change so as to ensure trade is not a threat to the conservation of nature is more difficult to achieve.

Examples of the information materials and communication channels used in TRAFFIC’s awareness raising initiatives include: video messages, posters & leaflets, children’s campaigns, souvenirs, social media campaigns and outreach with partners.

Germany
A joint TRAFFIC-WWF awareness brochure (PDF, 1.1 MB) in German on illegal wildlife souvenirs.
In July 2011, a conservation campaign was launched to warn European travellers about the souvenirs they bring home in a joint effort between German Customs and WWF Germany, with TRAFFIC providing technical advice for the leaflets. These were produced in 6 different languages and highlight the use of sniffer dogs in the fight against the illegal wildlife trade.

East Asia
Japan
In Japan, TRAFFIC has produced an educational DVD entitled Our Life and Wildlife – What is CITES? The film aims to educate Japanese travellers about sustainable consumption and CITES. The video uses the elephant ivory and vicuna trades as two examples of what will happen to wild resources if they are not consumed sustainably, and calls upon viewers to think more deeply about the environment they are leaving for future generations. The DVD has been distributed throughout Japan to diverse audiences, including company employees, college students, public libraries and government agencies and ministries.

China
In February 2015 TRAFFIC and WWF Illegal Wildlife Trade campaign was awarded a top media award for its contribution towards broadening horizons and promoting public welfare.

In 2007, TRAFFIC, WWF, the conservation organization and Ogilvy, an advertising agency, launched an advertising campaign in mainland China aimed at changing consumer attitudes towards unsustainable wildlife trade. The campaign, consisting of creative print, video and online advertisements in Chinese, is part of an awareness-raising project to inform urban consumers about the environmental harm that illegal and unsustainable wildlife trade causes, and by providing guidance on what actions they can take to help protect species.
Campaign poster: Graphic images depict the long evolutionary history of a particular species, ending abruptly at the use that threatens its survival.  
Campaign video: depicts the sudden end to Tiger evolution. It was shown at a Beijing subway station and on TV stations around mainland China.

In March 2013, a campaign themed as ‘Small Hands and Big Hands, Hand in Hand’ was launched in China, in several areas considered historically important within the wildlife trade. Such a campaign targeted elementary school students, in the hope that the information they receive will then be communicated onto family members, allowing a wider range of people to become involved.

Several TRAFFIC campaigns have focused on the souvenir trade - and encourage tourists to be aware of what goods they are purchasing.
Welcome to Tibet (2.2 MB) A 2006 brochure funded by WWF and TRAFFIC urges tourists not to buy threatened wildlife items when visiting Tibet.

Southeast Asia
Public Service Announcements (PSAs) produced by the WWF and TRAFFIC Greater Mekong Programmes pertaining to wildlife consumption - in particular of civets, pangolins, bears and king cobras.

Shop Carefully! video produced by the TRAFFIC East Asia office in Taipei to encourage responsible buying of souvenir items

In April 2014, the Taronga Conservation Society Australia in partnership with TRAFFIC launched a ‘Wildlife Witness’ app for smartphones that would allow users to report suspected illegal wildlife trade in South-East Asia simply by sending a photo and a location via the app to TRAFFIC. The information can then be analysed to help build up a clearer picture of the wildlife trade across South-East Asia, which can help facilitate better responses to illegal trading.

Thailand
An information panel in Suvarnabhumi airport, Thailand, alerts passengers "wildlife trafficking STOPS here"

Malaysia
In July 2011, the documentary ‘On Borrowed Time’, a joint release by WWF Malaysia and TRAFFIC, highlights the need for more intense efforts to stop poaching in the Belum-Temengor Forest of Malaysia, home to many critically endangered species that are at significant risk of being poached. The film calls for a revitalised taskforce to deal with poachers and a need for greater commitment to the protection of wildlife from all involved in the survival of the forest. The film subsequently won several awards for its success in highlighting the poaching problem had by this region.

In April 2014, TRAFFIC designed and released 500 car stickers to taxi drivers in Malaysia which encourage the public to report wildlife crime to the Wildlife Crime Hotline, managed by the Malaysian Conservation Alliance for Tigers, who TRAFFIC is partner to.

Singapore
In March 2015, in a collaboration with Wildlife Reserves Singapore (WRS), TRAFFIC launched a year-long campaign looking to educate the public on how consumer demand can drive the illegal wildlife trade. This campaign involves placing signs in WRS reserves to explain the effects of poaching on wildlife, in addition to a strong message being conveyed on the WRS website, demonstrating the importance of the ‘You Buy, They Die’ campaign. A memorandum of understanding was also signed between the two organisations.

Viet Nam
In May 2013, a public service announcement that features a popular Vietnamese singer was launched in support of TRAFFIC and WWF’s campaign to change consumer attitudes within Viet Nam in order to fight the illegal wildlife trade. This PSA explains to consumers that many of the uses of rhino horn are based upon perceptions and myths, rather than facts, in the hope of highlighting the plight of rhinos across the globe.

In May 2013, the Thang Long Water Puppet theatre held a series of shows for Vietnamese schoolchildren to support International Biodiversity Day, held annually on 22nd May. The show was known as ‘Ao Lang- Village Pond’ and explains habitat degradation and competition for natural resources, alongside exposing them to themes of biodiversity protection and foster a desire amongst the children to protect the environment.

In May 2010, the ‘Don’t Buy Trouble’ campaign was launched in Viet Nam, with posters of some of the most iconic Vietnamese species to create awareness amongst the Vietnamese public, as well as the tourists, that trade in these species is damaging and illegal, with any trade in these products having the distinct possibility of the imposition of a fine or prosecution. TRAFFIC consulted on the technical aspects of this campaign, which sees the posters displayed prominently in airports, as a part of a four year campaign with WWF to alter consumer behaviour with regards to wildlife trade.  

Bookmarks and stickers are used to raise awareness in Viet Nam as part of a wildlife trade campaign.
South Asia
India
In 2009, TRAFFIC India’s short film ‘Don’t Buy Trouble’ won an award for the ‘Best Public Service Announcement’ at the CMS Vatavaran Environment and Wildlife Film festival. The film is a part of the awareness campaign in India to prevent trade in illegal wildlife, by raising awareness within the general public as to what is or isn’t legal or illegal in the marketplace, in addition to making buyers aware of the actions they can take to prevent this trade from growing. This film follows on from the work done by the Consumer Awareness Campaign begun in 2007, which included the release of posters, alongside a leaflet entitled ‘Are you committing a crime? Think before you buy’.

In May 2015, the digital media campaign ‘Preserving the Future: Stop the Illegal Wildlife Trade’ run jointly by TRAFFIC, WWF-India and the Wildlife Crime Control Bureau aimed to highlight the plight of less well known animals, such as pangolins, turtles and corals, in order to increase awareness and concern for such species. The campaign involved a variety of measures, including infographics and a quiz, but it is thought that almost 1.4 million individuals were reached as a result of the campaign.

TRAFFIC India has produced a brochure, highlighting their work in the country (PDF, 700 KB)

A TRAFFIC India billboard raising awareness about Tiger conservation and (right) images of the board on display in Bangalore

Are you committing a crime? Think before you buy (3.9 MB) A TRAFFIC India leaflet encouraging caution in buying wildlife products

Africa
Cameroon

A poster raising awareness about wild meat (bushmeat) trade issues, produced by TRAFFIC's Central Africa Programme