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Tuesday
May302017

Viet Nam: Transport companies adopt zero-tolerance policies towards wildlife crime

Transport companies learn the importance of adopting zero-tolerance policy towards wildlife crime.Hanoi, Viet Nam, 30th May 2017—70 transport company managers and drivers understand the importance of adopting corporate social responsibility (CSR) policies against threatened wildlife consumption following a training workshop organized by TRAFFIC and the Vietnam Automobile Transport Association (VATA) in Hanoi.

The training provided information on the legislation governing the transportation of wildlife products and how transport companies can mitigate their reputational risks by implementing corporate social responsibility policies integrating zero-tolerance towards wildlife crime.

Last year, TRAFFIC and VATA developed a practical training curriculum on the impact of wildlife crime on wildlife protection and CSR integration that has been used in subsequent general training courses for leaders of transport companies within the VATA network.

“Wildlife trafficking can be considered as a transportation-dependent activity. Criminals are finding covert ways to transport their illegal goods among suppliers, buyers and middlemen, and they often make use of transport companies to do so. Being aware and reducing the risk of intentionally or unintentionally facilitating this illegal activity, transport companies can protect both their reputation and break the chain of illegally traded wildlife and wildlife products, including rhino horn,” said Madelon Willemsen, Head of TRAFFIC in Viet Nam.  

“The partnerships we have developed with civil society organizations such as VATA have been hugely beneficial in finding ways to combat wildlife crime in the transport sector.”

Dr Nguyen Van Thanh, Chairman of VATA said: “Risk management is a crucial component of a successful and sustainable business, especially for transport companies. We are giving participants the tools to integrate a zero-tolerance towards wildlife crime into their CSR policies and help stop the illegal trade. These companies are making responsible and sustainable business choices by joining us to protect local and global wildlife. This training will have a ripple effect upon the transport sector, reducing the reputational risk of these businesses while also fighting wildlife crime.”

Following the training, some transport companies have already committed to displaying behaviour change messaging in their offices, cars/trucks and at events or car stations where they operate. Others will give clear guidance and instructions to their staff through their company’s code of conduct not to transport or consume threatened wildlife.

The training, funded by the Agency for French Development (AFD), provided an opportunity for the companies to explore CSR integration to reduce the risks associated with illegal wildlife trade and to combat wildlife crime. By doing so, transport companies are promoting a culture of social and environmental responsibility among the business community.

For further information, contact:
Ms. Bui Thuy Nga, Program Officer for TRAFFIC in Viet Nam
Email: Nga.Bui@traffic.org

About VATA
VATA is a voluntary professional association where members are organizations and individuals who work on freight transport services sector. Established in compliance with the national law, VATA aims to gather and unite all members to ensure the right, legal benefits for its members and support for their operation to gain effectiveness and to contribute for development of socio-economic of the country. www.hiephoivantaioto.vn.

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