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TRAFFIC aims to ensure that trade in wild plants and animals is not a threat to the conservation of nature

Latest news from TRAFFIC

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Wednesday
Apr212010

Singaporeans tip the scales for pangolins

en Français

A private fundraising dinner and exhibition in Singapore raised SGD40,000 to support TRAFFIC Southeast Asia's work on pangolin trade in the region Click photo to enlarge © Cyril Ng   Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 21 April 2010—Singapore’s green groups came to the rescue of pangolins on Sunday, singing, dancing and dining their way towards raising SGD40,000 (USD29,148) for crucial research into some of South-East Asia’s most heavily trafficked mammals.

Led by Cicada Tree Eco-Place, a non-government organization that promotes Singapore’s natural and cultural heritage through environmental education and eco-living, the groups marshaled resources to hold a private fundraising dinner and exhibition, in aid of pangolins.

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Wednesday
Apr212010

Andhra Pradesh forest officials trained in wildlife law enforcement

en Français

TRAFFIC India assisted with the training of 45 Forest Department officers in wildlife law enforcement Click photo to enlarge © TRAFFIC India   Hyderabad, India, 21 April 2010—TRAFFIC India and WWF-India in collaboration with Andhra Pradesh Forest Department has helped train 45 Forest Department officers in wildlife law enforcement.

A two-day workshop, held over 17–18 April at Andhra Pradesh Forest Academy, Dulapally (Hyderabad), included sessions on effective implementation of India’s Wildlife (Protection) Act, 1972.

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Thursday
Apr152010

New rules over use of forest products in Bosnia and Herzegovina

en Français

Arnica montana, a medicinal plant species of particular conservation concern, has been included on the list of species forbidden for commercial collection in Bosnia and Herzegovina Click photo to enlarge © W. Kathe   Banja Luka, Republica Srpska (Bosnia and Herzegovina)—Bosnia and Herzegovina has announced new rules governing the use of non-wood forest products (NWFPs). The rules were drawn up in line with the principles and criteria of FairWild’s Standard for sustainable and fair use of wild collected species.

Non-wood forest products include materials such as medicinal and aromatic plants, mushrooms, berries, ornamental plants and lichens.

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Tuesday
Apr132010

Demand for frogs rising in West Africa

en Français

The latest TRAFFIC Bulletin investigates the trade in African Tiger and other frog species for human consumption in West Africa Click photo to enlarge © Meike Mohneke   Cambridge, UK, 13 April 2010—The demand for frogs for human consumption is rising dramatically in parts of West Africa, according to a paper published in the latest issue of the TRAFFIC Bulletin.

Dried or fried: amphibians in local and regional food market in West Africa describes the frog trade in Burkina Faso, Benin and Nigeria, based on interviews with local fishermen, collectors, market traders and others involved in the trade.

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Tuesday
Apr062010

Trainee judges receive overview of environmental and wildlife law

en Français

More than 80 trainee judicial officers attended a one-day programme on environmental and wildlife law Click photo to enlarge © TRAFFIC India   Delhi, India, April 2010—TRAFFIC India has conducted a one-day orientation programme on environmental and wildlife law for 83 trainee judicial officers at the request of the Delhi Judicial Academy (DJA). 

The programme provided an overview of the current status of forest and wildlife policies and legislation and helped raise awareness of wildlife conservation challenges of in India. There were detailed sessions on forestry conservation, illegal wildlife trade, environmental law and on the Supreme Court and Biodiversity Conservation in India.

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Thursday
Apr012010

Intrigue over poison arrow frog trade

en Français

The Green-and-black Poison Frog Dendrobates auratus was the poison arrow frog species most frequently reported in international trade, although there were some unexplained anomalies in the trade data Click photo to enlarge © Chris Martin Bahr / WWF-Canon   Cambridge, UK, 1 April 2010—There are suspicious discrepancies in the numbers of South American poison arrow frogs reported in international trade, according to a new study published in the journal Biodiversity and Conservation.

Vincent Nijman of the Oxford Wildlife Trade Research Group and Chris Shepherd of TRAFFIC Southeast Asia analysed international trade records reported to CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) between 2004 and 2008 in poison arrow frogs species native to South and Central America.

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Thursday
Apr012010

Access and Benefit-Sharing: Implications for the use of biological resources

en Français

Cumaru Dipteryx odorata seeds from Amazonian Brazil Click photo to enlarge © Asociación Vida Verde de la Amazonía – AVIVE  Cali, Colombia, 1 April 2010—Negotiations at a Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) meeting last week focused on finalizing the text of an International Regime (IR) on Access and Benefit-Sharing (ABS).

ABS lies at the core of the Convention and relates to the rights of communities to benefit from their traditional knowledge and access to their genetic resources.

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Thursday
Mar252010

Marine species get raw deal at CITES

en Français

Dancers at the opening ceremony, when many delegates were optimistic marine species would be listed by the Convention, but the optimism proved unfounded Click image to enlarge © TRAFFIC   Doha, Qatar, 25 March 2010 – A United Nations meeting on endangered species trade adjourned today after two weeks of negotiations marked by the repeated rejection of proposals to better protect marine species, such as the Atlantic bluefin tuna, corals and several shark species.

Trade issues on marine species failed to attract the necessary support at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES), which meets once every three years.

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Thursday
Mar252010

Shark issues given a greater focus by CITES

en Français

Although no shark species were listed in CITES, there was a commitment by countries to investigate the threat posed by illegal fishing Click photo to enlarge © Brian J Skerry / National Geographic stock / WWF   Doha, Qatar, 25 March 2010 - International investigation into the threat Illegal Unregulated and Unreported (IUU) fishing poses to the world’s sharks was called for today in a late amendment by New Zealand to a key document on shark conservation put before governments at a UN meeting on wildlife trade.

More than 130 governments meeting at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora, which finishes today in Doha, Qatar, agreed to a series of additional actions to address shark trade issues within the revised conference decision.

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Tuesday
Mar232010

Mixed fortunes for sharks at CITES

CITES delegates voted on whether to protect five shark species from overfishing, mainly for the fin trade Click photo to enlarge © Glenn Sant / TRAFFIC   Doha, Qatar, 23 March 2010 – Governments at a United Nations meeting on wildlife trade today voted against better international trade controls for five shark species, which are in severe decline because of overfishing for their high-value fins and meat.

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Tuesday
Mar232010

Ivory seizure highlights ongoing illicit trade in Viet Nam

en Français

Decorative ivory items illegally on sale in Viet Nam Click photo to enlarge © TRAFFIC   Quang Ninh, Viet Nam, 23 March 2010 - Vietnamese authorities have confiscated nearly 150 kg of elephant ivory in the Vietnamese province of Quang Ninh on the border with China.

Authorities made the seizure, which included 30 elephant tusks and 15 worked ivory pieces, from a car en route to the Vietnamese border town of Mong Cai on 19 March. The five passengers told police the goods were intended for sale in China.

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Tuesday
Mar232010

Bolivian beetle gets UN protection

en Français l in Japanese

An internet site advertising Dynastes satanas and other beetles for saleDoha, Qatar - A large rhinoceros beetle found only in wet forests in Bolivia has been given protection by a UN body meeting today in Doha, Qatar.

Little is known about the biology of Dynastes satanas, but it appears to be declining in the wild through habitat loss and because large numbers are harvested for export to Europe, the USA and Asia where they are popular as pets, and in Japan at least, used for fighting competitions.

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