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Focus on

Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement

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Iconic wildlife

Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks & rays l Tigers l others

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Forestry

Timber trade

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Fisheries

Fisheries regulation

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Medicinal plants

Medicinal and aromatic plants

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Wildmeat

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Pets & fashion

Wild animals used for pets & fashion

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Regions

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International Agreements

CBD l CITES l CMS

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TRAFFIC aims to ensure that trade in wild plants and animals is not a threat to the conservation of nature

Latest news from TRAFFIC

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Wednesday
Dec122012

Illegal wildlife trade threatens national security, says WWF report

NEW YORK, 12th December 2012—Perceived by organized criminals to be high profit and low risk, the illicit trade in wildlife is worth at least US$ 19 billion per year, making it the fourth largest illegal global trade after narcotics, counterfeiting, and human trafficking, according to a new report commissioned by WWF.

Besides driving many endangered species towards extinction, illegal wildlife trade strengthens criminal networks, undermines national security, and poses increasing risks to global health, according to the report, Fighting illicit wildlife trafficking: A consultation with governments, which will be unveiled today at a briefing for United Nations ambassadors in New York.

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Tuesday
Dec112012

Massive African ivory seizure in Malaysia

in Japanese

UPDATE: Royal Malaysian Customs has confirmed to TRAFFIC that the final tally of ivory seized at Port Klang is 2,341 pieces, weighing  a total of 6,034.3 kilogrammes. This makes it one of the largest seizures on record, but not more than the current record seizure, of 7.2 tonnes seized in Singapore in 2002.

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, 11th December 2012 – Royal Malaysian Customs have made their largest ever seizure of ivory in transit through the country, finding 1,500 pieces of tusks hidden in wooden crates purpose-built to look like stacks of sawn timber.

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Monday
Dec102012

New agreement between South Africa and Viet Nam - A turning point in tackling rhino poaching crisis, say WWF, TRAFFIC

Ha Noi, Viet Nam, 10th December 2012—A pivotal moment in efforts to tackle the current rhino poaching crisis took place today as the governments of South Africa and Vietnam signed a Memorandum of Understanding to improve co-operation between the two states on biodiversity conservation and protection including tackling illegal wildlife trafficking.

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Monday
Dec102012

Consumers beware: is your pet legal?

in Japanese

Cambridge, UK, 10 December 2012—Consumers buying pets should be aware of a new phenomenon, whereby the animals on sale are actually illegally sourced from the wild rather than legally captive bred.

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Wednesday
Dec052012

Review could lead to strengthened Russian legislation on endangered species

in Russian

Moscow, Russia, 5th December 2012—A review of Russian wildlife legislation carried out by TRAFFIC and WWF means a loophole that had previously allowed traffickers to get away with insignificant fines will be closed provided the Duma—the Federal Russian parliament—accept the necessary amendments.

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Tuesday
Dec042012

Thai airport authorities seize hundreds of animals in two separate seizures

Bangkok, Thailand, 4th December 2012—Authorities in Thailand have rescued 343 tortoises and freshwater turtles believed to be destined for markets in Hong Kong and arrested two men who were delivering the consignment for shipping. In a separate incident, snakes, scorpions and even centipedes were found in the luggage of a passenger due to fly to Doha.

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Friday
Nov302012

Bear necessities: International conference highlights need to eradicate illegal trade in wild bears

New Delhi, India, 30th November 2012—The real life counterpart of Rudyard Kipling’s Baloo faces severe pressure from illegal trade and strong enforcement efforts are needed to protect wild bears in Asia, delegates to an international conference on bear conservation were told.

More than 300 experts from 37 countries gathered in India at the 21st Conference of the International Bear Association held from 26-30th November 2012, to discuss a wide range of bear conservation, research and management issues. 

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Thursday
Nov292012

Chinese enforcement officers learn to combat illegal marine turtle trade

in Chinese

Beihai City, Guangxi Province, China—TRAFFIC, in collaboration with the provincial CITES Management Authority, supported the training of enforcement officers from the Fishery Department, Industry and Commerce Department, and Customs of Guangxi Province on illegal trade in marine turtles.

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