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Latest news from TRAFFIC

Monday
Nov232009

Congo Basin partners discuss conservation and sustainable forestry management

en Français

Denis Koulagna, Secretary General of MINFOF meets Roland Melisch and Germain Ngandjui of TRAFFIC at the TRAFFIC stand in the “Information Market” where 30 exhibitors from across the region were able to share their experiences, data and information Click on photo to enlarge © Eva Paule MOUZONG / TRAFFIC  Yaoundé, Cameroon, 23 November 2009—More than 300 experts representing the Congo Basin Forest Partnership (CBFP) * gathered in Yaoundé this month for the 6th Plenary Meeting to discuss conservation and sustainable management of forest resources in the Congo Basin.

HE Emmanuel Bizot, Minister for Water, Forests, Fisheries and Hunting of the Central African Republic and current President of COMIFAC stressed the importance of the meeting and reminded participants that CBFP’s role was to “conduct consultations with partners to maintain the operational capability of COMIFAC (the Central African Forests Commission).”

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Monday
Nov232009

Improving Viet Nam’s CITES Enforcement

Participants from Ha Noi Police at the first of two CITES training workshops being held in Viet Nam Click photo to enlarge © Ha Noi Environmental Police   Ha Noi, Viet Nam, 23 November—More than two dozen of Viet Nam’s Environmental Police will gather this week in Ha Noi for four days of training on wildlife trade enforcement.

The training, led by German CITES experts, will focus on the regulations, implementation and enforcement of CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), the primary agreement regulating international trade in wildlife and wildlife products.

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Friday
Nov202009

Bangkok learns about environmental crime

The public unveiling of the information boards Click photo to enlarge © TRAFFIC   Bangkok, Thailand, 20 November 2009—Information boards highlighting the five most prominent crimes committed against the environment are on display at a popular mall in the heart of Bangkok’s shopping district, thanks to a collaboration between the Asian Regional Partners Forum on Combating Environmental Crime (ARPEC), which includes TRAFFIC, and Bangkok’s Emporium Shopping Complex.

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Wednesday
Nov182009

Enforcement officers put in the picture

Update, April 2013: a revised, second edition is available, including a number of additional identification sheets (PDF, 10 MB)

Bangkok, Thailand, 19 November 2009—One of the hardest daily challenges facing wildlife law enforcement officers is to recognize which species are being traded in order to determine if the trade is legal.

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Wednesday
Nov182009

Kota Kinabalu hosts "Heart of Borneo" Judiciary Workshop

The illegal trade of wildlife is a major threat to Borneo's biodiversity, including high profile animals like the orangutan Click photo to enlarge © Chris R. Shepherd / TRAFFIC Southeast Asia   en Français

Kota Kinabalu, Malaysia, 18 November 2009—From 18-19 November a regional judiciary workshop on wildlife crime is taking place in Kota Kinabalu, Sabah, Malaysia, the first of its kind held on the island of Borneo.

Representatives from the Malaysian, Indonesian and Bruneian Courts and Attorney General's Offices will participate in discussions on mutual legal assistance, enforcement and the prosecution of wildlife crimes, as part of the judiciary's commitment to tackle organized poaching and trafficking of wild animals and plants in Borneo.

The workshop has been organized by TRAFFIC Southeast Asia and Sabah Wildlife Department and supported by WWF-Heart of Borneo Initiative, and funded by the US State Department.

The illegal trade of wildlife is a major threat to Borneo's biodiversity, from species little known to the public like pangolins, through to high profile animals like the orangutan.

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Thursday
Nov122009

Deepwater set gillnets banned in the South Pacific Ocean

Click on map to see approximate area where deepwater gillnets have been banned on the high seas © TRAFFIC   

en Français

Auckland, New Zealand, 14 November 2009—A ban on the use of deepwater set gillnets was announced today at the close of a meeting to establish a regional fisheries management organization that will have legally-binding control over fishing in the South Pacific Ocean.

Deepwater gillnets impact heavily on vulnerable species such as sharks, many of them already in marked decline through overfishing.

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Monday
Nov092009

Illegal ivory trade rising

A series of recent large-scale ivory seizures suggest an increased involvement of organized crime syndicates in the illicit ivory trade, connecting African source countries with Asian end-use markets. © Joyce Wu/TRAFFIC Click photo to enlarge  

in Japanese l en Français

Cambridge, UK, 10 November 2009—The illicit trade in ivory, which has been increasing in volume since 2004, moved sharply upward in 2009, according to the latest analysis of seizure data in the Elephant Trade Information System (ETIS).

ETIS, one of the two monitoring systems for elephants under CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora) but managed by TRAFFIC, comprises the world’s largest collection of elephant product seizure records.

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Saturday
Nov072009

“Don’t Buy Trouble” film wins CMS Vatavaran Award

Delhi, India, 7 November 2009—TRAFFIC India’s film “Don’t Buy Trouble” has received an award at the CMS Vatavaran Environment and Wildlife Film festival held in New Delhi this October.

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Friday
Nov062009

Australia confiscates 130 km long deepwater gillnet

This vessel—the Anela—was photographed by a New Zealand Patrol on the high seas between Australia and New Zealand, and is believed to have deepwater gillnetting equipment aboard Click photo to enlarge © New Zealand Maritime Surveillance Patrol   

en Français

Sydney, Australia, 6 November 2009—Just days after TRAFFIC wrote to the fledgling South Pacific Regional Fisheries Management Organization (SPRFMO) to express alarm that Flag States are allowing deepwater gillnetting, Australia has revealed it confiscated a huge gillnet set illegally in Antarctic waters earlier this year.

The net, or rather series of nets strung together, was confiscated this April at Banzare Bank in the south western Indian Ocean and measured a staggering 130 km end to end—roughly the same distance as the width of New Zealand’s South Island—and set at a depth of 1.5 km.

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