Search TRAFFIC

NOTE: Please see instructions here to search inside TRAFFIC's PDFs

Subscribe to news

STAY UP TO DATE

news, studies, issues and events from the world of wildlife trade.

Latest News

 

Also of interest

Wildlife crime is serious - watch the video!

...............................................................

Interested in a Masters in Conservation Leadership at the University of Cambridge? More details...

...............................................................

TRAFFIC is grateful for the financial contribution from The Rufford Foundation towards this website

Useful links
Focus on

Behaviour change l Conservation awareness l Enforcement

...............................................................

Iconic wildlife

Apes l Bears l Deer l Elephants l Leopards l Marine turtles l Pangolins l Reptiles l Rhinos l Sharks & rays l Tigers l others

...............................................................

Forestry

Timber trade

...............................................................

Fisheries

Fisheries regulation

...............................................................

Medicinal plants

Medicinal and aromatic plants

...............................................................

Wildmeat

Wildmeat resources

...............................................................

Pets & fashion

Wild animals used for pets & fashion

...............................................................

Regions

Africa l Americas l Asia l Australasia l Europe l Middle East

...............................................................

International Agreements

CBD l CITES l CMS

...............................................................

Friday
Mar122010

Chinese medicine societies reject use of tiger bones ahead of CITES conference

en Français

The World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies has urged its members not to use parts from endangered wildlife. TRAFFIC's Xu Hongfa speaking at the meeting © TRAFFIC Click photo to enlarge   Doha, Qatar, 12 March 2010 – WWF and TRAFFIC International welcome a World Federation of Chinese Medicine Societies (WFCMS) statement urging its members not to use tiger bone or any other parts from endangered wildlife.

The statement was made at a symposium on Friday in Beijing and notes that some of the claimed medicinal benefits of tiger bone have no basis. The use of tiger bones was removed from the traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) pharmacopeia in 1993, when China first introduced a domestic ban on tiger trade.

“Tiger conservation has become a political issue in the world. Therefore, it’s necessary for the traditional Chinese medicine industry to support the conservation of endangered species, including tigers,” said Huang Jianyin, deputy secretary of WFCMS.

Illegal trade in Asian big cat products is a key issue at the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) Conference of Parties meeting at Doha, Qatar. China is among the 175 countries that are signatories to this international treaty governing wildlife trade.

“CITES governments should be encouraged by this statement and use the opportunity they have at this meeting to pass measures, that if properly enforced, can help put an end to tiger trade,” said Dr. Colman O’Criodain, Wildlife trade analyst, WWF International.  

The statement also calls on all WFCMS’ members to promote tiger conservation and encourages them to abide by all relevant international and national regulations on wildlife trade.

“The Societies’ public declaration is a clear signal that the traditional Chinese medicinal community is now backing efforts to secure a future for wild tigers,” said Professor Xu Hongfa, head of TRAFFIC’s programme in China.

As an international traditional Chinese academic organization, the WFCMS stated that it had a duty to research the conservation of endangered species, including tigers.

“In the meantime, We will ask our members not to use endangered wildlife in traditional Chinese medicine, and reduce the misunderstanding and bias of the international community,” said the WFCMS’ Huang Jianyin. “The traditional Chinese medicine industry should look for substitutes and research on economical and effective substitutes for tiger products, which will improve the international image and status of traditional Chinese medicine and promote TCM in the world.” 

The WFCMS is an international academic organization based in Beijing, with 195 member organizations spanning 57 nations where traditional Chinese medicine is used. It aims to promote the development of traditional Chinese medicine, which is a primary form of healthcare delivery in China, and widely regarded as an important part of China’s rich cultural heritage.

WWF and TRAFFIC are calling for a permanent ban on all trade in tiger parts and products, and for a curtailment of commercial captive breeding operations.

Wild tigers are especially in the spotlight as 2010 marks the celebration of the Year of the Tiger in the Chinese lunar calendar. This year is seen as a unique opportunity to galvanize international action to save this iconic species. 

The speech by Li Zhenji, the vice president and secretriat of WFCMS (in Chinese)

WFCMS website

 

PrintView Printer Friendly Version

EmailEmail Article to Friend

« Peru given six months to clean up mahogany trade | Main | Experts meet to discuss Non-Wood Forest Products trade in SE Europe »