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Thursday
Feb192009

Canadian firm convicted of trading in Tiger parts

Medicines containing Tiger derivatives are banned Click photo to enlarge © TRAFFIC Cambridge, UK, 19 February 2009—A traditional Asian medicine firm based in Canada has been convicted of possessing and attempting to sell medicines containing parts from Tigers and other protected species.

Wing Quon Enterprises Ltd. pleaded guilty on 17 February in a Richmond Provincial Court to possession for the purpose of dealing in Tiger parts and was fined CAN45,000 (USD36,000).

CAN40,000 (USD32,000) of this was awarded by the court to TRAFFIC, to help further its efforts to ensure that wildlife trade is not detrimental to the conservation of nature.

The company was also ordered to forfeit seized medicines and products made from other endangered species, including costus root, agarwood, bear, pangolin, musk deer and rhinoceros. All are listed in CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora), which strictly controls any international trade in them.

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